The Mind Thing

As a fitness enthusiast and well I may add that I took up BS Psychology though was not able to finish my study, I am thinking that having a body that looks healthy will never be enough. Having a healthy mind correlates with having a healthy body. Why did I say so?

In every sport, it would require you to think clearly, of course and without a healthy mind, can you think clearly? Having a healthy mind is a wide subject to talk about I know as it is hard to distinguish having a healthy mind when we have clutters within us that are stopping us from thinking clearly. Having a healthy mind in my own opinion is connected to what attitude, on how we adapt to distractions. Again, this subject is too wide as there are many aspects that we need to consider like psychological tests and stuff like that. Okay then, let me simplify this by, finding ways how we can think clearly. How can we think clearly? By training our brain which we can find the full article about it here: http://breakingmuscle.com/health-medicine/bdnf-basics-7-ways-to-train-your-brain

In my own personal experience, meditation plays a very important role after every exercise. It looks odd I know sitting inside the gym or outdoor after every exercise routine that I do but, I do not mind as it is for my wellness, my goal: a healthy mind and a healthy body.

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Are you supposed to apply Hot or Cold Compress?

Okay, I had a training two days ago wherein I had to spar with a person taller and heavier than me. The result, blister on my left foot as a result of twisting the foot to execute round house kick and I have strain on my right foot as a result of pinning my sparring mate. Pinning is a general grappling hold used in ground fighting which is aimed to subdue by exerting superior control over an opponent and pinning the opponent to the ground. Pinning holds are also used in submission wrestling and mixed martial arts, even though the pinning hold itself is not a winning condition. I love sparring with him as he is heavier and taller than me and I am thinking that I will learn more as time goes by.

So the question, am I supposed to apply hot or cold compress? I was not able to ask my coach because I did not feel it after the training but I felt it day after the training. I went to our clinic and I was advised to apply cold compress because it is not swelling and it will help to alleviate pain and I have to take pain relievers (which will not fix the problem, right?).

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So I asked some friends and it was like I administered a quick survey. I asked five friends who are nurses and three of them advised me to apply hot compress for 20 minutes, let my foot rest so that the blood flow will be cleared in that area, then after 10 minutes wrap it with bandage, and apply cold compress for 20 minutes until it feels numb then let it rest for 10 minutes and apply cold compress for 20 minutes which I did, and I feel better now (I did not take pain reliever).

They left my curiosity at play, so I did some google searches and here is what I have found: https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?ContentTypeID=1&ContentID=4483

When to Use Hot and Cold Therapy?

Heat and cold are the two most common types of noninvasive and nonaddictive pain-relief therapies for muscle and joint pain. Which one you use depends on whether the pain is new or recurring.

In general, a new injury will cause inflammation and possibly swelling. Ice will decrease the blood flow to the injury, thereby decreasing inflammation and swelling. Pain that recurs can be treated with heat, which will bring blood to the area and promote healing.

The following information can help you learn when and how to use temperature-related therapies.

Heat therapy

What does heat therapy do?

Heat opens up blood vessels, which increases blood flow and supplies oxygen and nutrients to reduce pain in joints and relax sore muscles, ligaments, and tendons. The warmth also decreases muscle spasms and can increase range of motion. Applying superficial heat to your body can improve the flexibility of tendons and ligaments, reduce muscle spasms, and alleviate pain.

How is it applied?

Sources of heat can supply either dry or moist warmth. Dry heat sources may dry the skin. Moist heat may penetrate better. Heat can be applied by an electric or microwavable heating pad, hot water bottle, gel packs, or hot water baths. The heat should be warm, not too hot, and should be maintained at a consistent temperature, if possible. Ask your doctor or physical therapist which heat source would be best for you.

When do you use it?

Apply heat if you have stiff joints or chronic muscle and joint pain.

How can I use it safely?

Don’t apply it directly to skin. Instead, wrap the hot device in a thin towel.

Here are other tips:

Don’t apply heat for longer than 20 minutes, unless your doctor or physical therapist recommends longer.

Don’t use heat if there’s swelling. Use cold first, then heat.

Don’t use heat if you have poor circulation or diabetes.

Don’t use heat on an open wound or stitches.

Don’t lie down on a heating pad; you could fall asleep and burn your skin.

Cold therapy

What does cold therapy do?

Cold slows down blood flow to an injury, thereby reducing pain and swelling. Cold therapy slows circulation, reducing inflammation, muscle spasm, and pain. It should be used if the area is swollen or bruised.

How is it applied?

Cold is applied by an ice or gel pack.

When do you use it?

Any cold treatment should be used for 24 to 48 hours after an injury. Cold therapy is good for sprains, strains, bumps, and bruises that may occur in sports or lifting. Apply cold packs or ice bags to injured areas for no more than 20 minutes at a time, removing the cold for 10 minutes and reapplying it again.

How can I use it safely?

Don’t apply it for longer than 20 minutes. Also, wrap ice or ice packs in a thin towel before applying.

If in doubt as to whether to apply heat or cold to an injury, call your health care provider’s office.

FOR PREVENTING MARTIAL ARTS INJURIES, you may also want to read http://fistgym.com.ph/articles/preventing-and-dealing-with-martial-arts-injuries

So you want to be Fit, Eh?

Myth: If you are fit you are healthy.

Fact: When you are fit it does not necessarily mean that you are healthy. Have you checked if you are getting enough macronutrients and micronutrients from your diet? Check what you are eating and to learn more, you may check this site: http://bonfirehealth.com/micronutrients-macronutrients-food-breakdown/ . Not because you look fit does not mean you are healthy bruh.

Myth: If you are fit, you are flexible.

Fact: I guess this is no brainer. Flexibility comes from a specific training. In BJJ, you are being trained to be flexible as you have to do some rolls and with wrestling as well and I know some people who looks fit yet they cannot even reach their foot while they are standing.

Myth: People who look bulky are strong.

Fact: Who said? I know some who are steroid users and not because you look fit, you are strong.

To be strong:

  1. Do Strength Training. Since I strongly believed that this should not be costly, have time to read more about strength training and there are so many exercises that you can do that does not require you gym membership.
  2. Get Enough Rest. 8 hours sleep a day is advisable and it is science. No need to provide further details about this because I am sure that you have heard or read a lot about benefits of having enough sleep.
  3. Eat Real Foods. Get away from food that contains high cholesterol and those foods that contain bad fats. (You can read more about good and bad fats here: http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/good-fats-bad-fats)
  4. Have a Positive Outlook. You know the old saying that what your mind can conceive, the body can achieve? Or have you heard about “Law of Attraction”?

Want to learn more about strength training, I highly recommend this site which I am not affiliated with: Muay Thai Pros

As much as I wanted to add more to this myth and fact thingy and add more information, I cannot think of any other as of this moment. By the way, I found a gym near my place, walking distance from my apartment that would only cost Php 650.00 ($13.94) per month for unlimited visit. Will be posting a review soon…

Leg Power! NO GYM REQUIRED

So, a friend of mine said her legs are weak so she cannot do exercises. I had weak legs too and not to mention, I am flat footed which made it more challenging for me. Luckily, there are so many ways on how to develop strong legs. Thanks for my Muay Thai training but most of all, if you are determined enough to do so, you may try the things that will help you develop strong legs.

Start by walking 15-20 minutes a day (walking your dog is okay) and if you can jog, much better. The more you do, the more you are exercising those legs, the more they will develop. Since I am such a believer that you can achieve your fitness goals without suffering from being broke, here are some exercises aside from walking or jogging that will help you achieve strong legs (Some exercises will not only help you develop legs):

Warm-up

Repeat this light cardio warm-up twice before beginning the main circuit.

  1. March in place for 60 seconds
  2. Run in place for 60 seconds
  • 20 seconds high knees (quickly tucking your knees as close to your chest as possible)
  • 20 seconds with legs wide (slightly wider than shoulder distance apart)
  • 20 seconds butt kicks (as if you are trying to kick your butt with your heels)
  1. Side jacks for 30 seconds

Start standing with your feet shoulder-distance apart. Step quickly to the right and do a partial squat. As you squat, raise your arms above your head. Return to the start position and repeat with the left leg. Repeat for the time duration.

  1. Lunge with alternate arm raises for 30 seconds

As you lunge forward with the right leg, raise your left arm. If you cannot keep your balance with your arm raised, then simply do alternate lunges.

The Circuit (50 seconds per exercise)

Single-leg squat

How to: Begin in a standing position on the left leg. Slowly lower yourself as far as you can. Push back up to return to the start position. Switch legs halfway.

Box incline pushup

How to: These can be done with your knees on the ground if you cannot do them with your legs at full extension. It is more important to have perfect form than it is to have your legs extended. Put your hands on a box and the feet on the ground. Slowly lower the chest until it is even with the hands. Push back up to return to start position.

Basic crunches

How to: The title might say basic, but when these are done correctly, they will pump your abs up! Keep your back flat and try to prevent it arching as much as possible.

Backward lunge

How to: Begin with feet shoulder-width apart and hands on your waist. Step the left foot backwards until the knee makes contact with the ground. Return to the start position by pushing off your left foot and returning to the start position. Switch legs halfway.

Alternate Superman

How to: Lie flat on your stomach, with your arms stretched over your head and your palms facing down. Lift your left arm and your right leg, hold briefly. Switch sides. Repeat.

Box dips

How to: Begin in a sitting position with the hands facing forward on the box and feet on the ground. Slowly lower your body until the arms are at 90 degrees and then return to start.

Single-leg bridge

How to: Lying on the ground with knees bent, take one leg and cross it over the other. Keep shoulders on the ground as you raise your hips up to the ceiling and slowly lower down. Switch legs halfway.

Plank

How to: Start by lying face down, with your forearms on the ground, palms facing flat on the ground. Come up on to your toes and forearms. Make sure your back stays flat with no arch or pike. Keep your abdominals tight. Hold the whole time.

Squat thrusts (aka “burpees”)

How to: Begin with feet shoulder-width apart in a standing position. Descend into a squat position and kick the legs back and bring your hands forward to create a pushup position. Once the legs come into contact with the ground, pull them back under the body and return to the standing position. To increase the difficulty, you can add a hop when you come up to standing position, and/or a pushup when you are in the high plank position.

Bicycle crunches

How to: Lie on your back as if you are going to do a basic crunch. Raise your legs so they are at a 90-degree angle, with your shins parallel to the floor. Place your hands lightly behind your head, not pulling on your neck. Extend your left leg straight and bring your right knee into your chest while bringing your left elbow over to your knee. (They likely will not touch, and that’s not necessarily the goal.) Think about twisting to bring your chest to the knee, rather than your arm to avoid pulling on your neck. Alternate sides continuously for the whole segment.

Alternative Exercises (If you can’t do the list above):

Here’s the leg circuit routine that we did:

Walking lunges for the length of the basketball court

  • 10+ box jumps on a 2 foot high box
  • 10+ vertical jumps starting from a full squat
  • 25+ 1 leg standing calve raises
  • 25+ bodyweight squats on your tippy toes (i.e. aka hindu squats)

Repeat the circuit at least 3 times. If you are feeling extra energetic you can do more, but 3 times through will be a killer workout for most people.

Just to add, daily calcium intake is also helpful in developing leg muscles and avoiding fatty foods that will cause your knees suffer from uric acid which are caused by you know, fatty foods.

Sources:

http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2015/01/02/60-minute-session-no-gym-required-strength-training

http://leehayward.com/blog/bodyweight-leg-workout/

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